January 18, 2022 CoW and City Council Meetings

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Committee of the Whole

You can find the agenda HERE and the council packet for the week HERE. You can watch a video of the meeting HERE.

Council President Melody Hart called the meeting to order. The Clerk of Council called roll.

The first item on the agenda was the legislative overview. Mayor Kahlil Seren presented the legislation for that evening’s City Council meeting.

Mayor Seren stated two of the pieces of legislation are ceremonial. The administration requested passage for both of them.

  • Resolution 005-2022: First Reading. A Resolution proclaiming February 2022 to be American Heart Month; and declaring an emergency.
  • Resolution 006-2022: First Reading. A Resolution recognizing February 2022 as National African American History Month; and declaring an emergency.

Next, there were budget adjustments.

  • Ordinance 007-2022: First Reading. An Ordinance to amend certain subparagraphs of Ordinance No. 139-2021 (F), relating to appropriations and other expenditures of the City of Cleveland Heights, Ohio for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2022; and declaring an emergency.

Council President Hart asked about the presentation of the budget adjustments being made for the purpose of purchasing real property located at 13230-13232 Cedar Rd. (page 11 of the PACKET), asking the mayor to clarify where the $290,000 adjustment is coming from and how we were offsetting the cost. (The $171,041.21 is being offset by a grant the City is receiving.) Mayor Seren stated the $290,000 is coming from the general fund and is a contribution from the City for the Cedar-Lee project. Hart stated that she understands that this is part of the signed Development Agreement but asked how this will impact the overall 2022 budget. Finance Director Amy Himmelein explained that the $290,000 is coming from the general fund and that we are not getting an increase in revenue for that amount; however, looking at preliminary numbers, 2021 income tax revenues ended much better than anticipated, so the City does have the funding available for this project. Mayor Seren then clarified that the $290,000, although it appears twice on the sheet provided in the packet, is actually moving from the general fund to the economic development fund to the planning fund.

Councilmember Tony Cuda stated that, in the future, he would like a clear statement in legislation such as this stating that a yes vote will allow the City to (enter goal of the legislation). Law Director Bill Hanna stated that, though not illegal, language such as that in legislation is unusual, though there may be a way to use slightly different language to express the same thing; Hanna stated there might be a better place outside the legislation to place the plainer sentence Councilmember Cuda is requesting.

Council President Hart suggested a footnote or a memo on budget adjustment sheets to better explain where funds are coming from. Mayor Seren explains that the sheet does show where the money is going. Councilmember Cuda stated that it was not clear to him when he was reviewing the documents on his own. Mayor Seren also reiterated that this piece of legislation does not spend the money; it only authorizes the movement of money from one City fund to another, and a separate piece of legislation (Ordinance 010-2022) authorizes the City to spend the money.

Council President Hart again stated that the presentation did not make it clear to her where the money was coming from and how it would impact the 2022 budget. Finance Director Himmelein stated that if you see an increase, it’s increasing the budget; if you see a transfer, its decreasing one fund and increasing another fund; and if you see decrease, it’s decreasing the budget (in the column “Reason” of page 11 of the packet). Mayor Seren restated that the City is taking money from the general fund and putting it into another fund, but what is not shown on the sheet is the complementary decrease in the general fund; Hart confirmed that this is the issue. Mayor Seren stated that the decrease from the general fund is assumed when there are increases to other funds; the source fund (fund 101) is the general fund. Council President Hart suggested she will speak with Finance Director Himmelein one-on-one about the matter. Councilmember Davida Russell asked for the presentation to be simpler, and Councilmember Cuda stated that he wants to see the where the money is coming from and where it is going so he understands immediately that the result will be budget neutral. Mayor Seren stated that he will work with Finance Director Himmelein to make the presentation clearer and easier to understand.

Councilmember Russell then expressed that she is happy to hear that our end-of-year revenues were better than expected and then asked the mayor whether that means that a 30% budget cut for all City departments is now no longer necessary. Mayor Seren stated that it’s premature to make that determination but assured Council that to the degree that the City can avoid cuts, he will always work to do that.

Mayor Seren then moved on to legislation that would update signatories on City accounts to reflect the City’s new leadership.

  • Resolution 008-2022: First Reading. A Resolution updating the signatories designated for the account with Nirvana Public Funding, LLC; and declaring an emergency.
  • Resolution 009-2022: First Reading. A Resolution updating the list of City employees authorized to be signatories on certain City accounts; and declaring an emergency.

The next ordinance, which is for first reading only, would authorize the purchase of a property that will be made part of the Cedar-Lee development project. He stated that Council was briefed on this last October, where Council was informed that the administration at the time wanted to pursue an option to purchase the property; Council’s approval was not required for that option because the cost for the option was less than the $50,000 threshold required for Council approval. Now that the administration would like to purchase the property, Council approval is necessary because the purchase price exceeds the $50,000 threshold. The City is required to inform the property owner by written notice of the City’s intent to exercise this option by the end of January. Mayor Seren clarified that the administration does not require Council approval to provide written notice, but Council approval is needed to execute the purchase agreement.

  • Ordinance 010-2022: First Reading Only. An Ordinance authorizing the Mayor to execute an agreement for the purchase of certain real property located at 13230-13232 Cedar Rd.; and declaring an emergency.

Mayor Seren explained that the final piece of legislation relates to the City’s Community Improvement Corporation (CIC). The City needs to change the articles of incorporation to reflect the mayor instead of the city manager on the board of the CIC.

Councilmember Cuda asked for more clarification in “whereas” clauses to reflect the why of legislation (e.g., the change of form of government). He also asked whether the CIC is on our City’s website, as he did not know that there was a Cleveland Heights CIC and could not find it on the website. He stated he is not clear what it is and why we have it.

Mayor Seren explained that a few years ago the City began discussing the creation of a CIC, which is particular in Ohio revised code. A CIC is a nonprofit corporation created by a government for the exclusive purposes of promoting the economic development of a municipality. The Cleveland Heights CIC was established in 2019 and has primarily functioned as an intermediary for property transfers from the land bank to developers, such as FutureHeights, Start Right, and Amato for the infill housing projects. Mayor Seren noted that CICs can do a lot more than this potentially.

Councilmember Russell asked if this is on first reading only; Mayor Seren stated that the administration is asking for passage that evening.

  • Ordinance 011-2022: First Reading. An Ordinance amending Ordinance No. 13-2019 to reflect the position of the Mayor and the elimination of the City Manager position based upon the change in form of government; authorizing the Mayor to file appropriate amended Articles of Incorporation.

Council President Hart then moved on to the next agenda item, the initiative petition. Hart asked Law Director Hanna to review the process, the timeline, and Council’s obligations.

Law Director Hanna stated:

  • At Council’s last meeting (January 10), the proposed measure was certified to Council because of the sufficiency of the number of signatures, which was consistent with the requirements of the Charter (Article VIII, section 1).
  • At that meeting, as required, the measure was referred to a committee, the Committee of the Whole.
  • The Committee of the Whole may hold public hearings on the measure (but it is not required) and shall (must) make a report and recommendation back to the full Council not later than its second regular meeting following the meeting at which it was referred (February 7).
  • After the report and recommendation is made to Council, Council must immediately take up the consideration of the proposed ordinance and act on it within 30 days from that date (March 9). Law Director Hanna stated that March 9 is a problematic date if the City’s intention is to avoid a freestanding special election on the measure, as the deadline under Ohio law to send it to the ballot is March 3.
  • There is also a 10-day period during which, if Council (after receiving the report and recommendation from the Committee of the Whole) rejects or passes it with amendments, the petitioners committee may require that it be submitted to the voters.
  • If the petitioners committee requires Council to submit the measure to the voters, Council must then pass a resolution calling for an election. The 10-day period and the resolution calling for an election would all need to occur prior to the Board of Elections’ March 3 deadline.

Council President Hart asked Law Director Hanna to clarify what Council is voting on when we vote either yes, no, or amend for the proposed ordinance. Hanna replied that Council would be voting on the ordinance contained in the petition; a yes vote would pass the ordinance, and the measure then would not go to the ballot. To vote no or to amend and then vote yes on the amended ordinance would open the possibility of the ordinance appearing on the ballot. The second vote would be that of a resolution authorized the Board of Elections to put the measure on the ballot.

Councilmember Josie Moore confirmed with Law Director Hanna that, if the resolution is passed on a regular Council meeting day, the latest date to pass the resolution is February 28.

Council President Hart then opened the floor for options, particularly in regard to whether the Committee of the Whole should hold a public hearing on the matter. Councilmember Cuda asked the difference between a public hearing and residents making comments at the top of a City Council meeting. Law Director Hanna stated that the public hearing would be a special-purpose entry on the Committee of the Whole agenda; only comments related to the initiative would be heard.

Councilmember Moore asked how much notice must be given to the public for a public hearing. Law Director Hanna stated that there is no requirement in the charter provision or Council rules.

Councilmember Russell asked if a public hearing can be done prior to a City Council meeting. Law Director Hanna stated that it can be done in a Committee of the Whole meeting, reiterating that technically the hearing is before the Committee of the Whole.

Council President Hart asked if there are comments about how Council would like to proceed. Councilmember Craig Cobb stated that, regardless of what we do, he would like the City to avoid holding a special election, so we need to proceed with haste. He stated that, in regard to a public hearing, there has already been a lot of public discussion about the matter, and he does not think that we need a public hearing. He stated that four of the current councilmembers already voted on it, and he’s not inclined to change his mind.

Mayor Seren confirmed with the law director that it would only require three councilmembers to reject the ordinance, as we don’t have four councilmembers in favor of it, as Council presently only has six members. Council President Hart noted that if Council appoints a new member during this process, that may not be the case.

Councilmember Cuda stated that a public hearing would provide the opportunity for the public to speak to Council on this question.

Councilmember Moore asked whether the public hearing could be scheduled for the following Committee of the Whole meeting (January 24), and then have the Committee of the Whole report to Council the following Monday (February 7); Law Director Hanna said yes.

Law Director Hanna also clarified that what we all think of a special election is a day when no other election is happening, and that is very costly to the City. Technically, if this were to appear on the May 3 ballot, it would still be a special election, but it would be much less expensive because all the election machinery will have already been deployed. Council President Hart informed Council that she spoke with the Board of Elections, and the approximate cost of putting this measure on the May 3 ballot would be $18,000, and it would cost the City approximately $112,000 if it were on a different date.

Council President Hart asked whether members feel that the public wants a public hearing. Councilmember Moore stated that she did not know, but that there is no harm in holding a public hearing. Council agreed that if the public hearing is held the following Committee of the Whole meeting, then it is a good idea to hold it.

Council President Hart then announced that there will be a public hearing on January 24 at the Committee of the Whole meeting (6:30pm), and the Committee of the Whole will then provide a report and recommendation to Council on February 7.

(Council President Hart then conferred with Councilmember Moore that this means that discussion of Moore’s resolution declaring climate change an emergency and creating an Environmental Sustainability Committee will need to be delayed again; Moore agreed that the delay is unavoidable.)

The Committee of the Whole will discuss their recommendation after the public hearing on January 24.

Councilmember Moore asked whether, on February 7, when Committee of the Whole makes their report and recommendation to Council, could Council vote on the issue that night, or is time needed to prepare anything; Law Director Hanna stated that there is no requirement that Council waits; Council can vote on whether to adopt, amend, or reject the ordinance on February 7.

Councilmember Anthony Mattox asked whether there can be a presentation by staff at the public hearing. Mayor Seren stated that he would consider instructing staff to provide some context, but he had not anticipated presenting much on the Cedar-Lee-Meadowbrook project. Mayor Seren said he does not want to overshadow discussion of the initiative proposal itself. Law Director Hanna suggested presenting a timeline similar to the discussion Council just had so that the public can have that information as well. Councilmember Mattox agreed that providing that kind of context and framing the boundaries of the discussion and the issue at hand can be very helpful for the public hearing process.

Councilmember Cobb asked whether we are satisfied that a week’s notice is sufficient. The mayor and law director confirmed that we are complying with the City’s notice requirements. Councilmember Moore stated that, if desired, each councilmember can get the word out as well through our own communication channels to let people know that we want public input.

Council President Hart summarized that at the January 24 Committee of the Whole meeting we will hold a public hearing, the City will present at the beginning of the hearing to provide context, the Committee of the Whole will discuss the matter directly after the public hearing and prepare our report and recommendation, then the Committee of the Whole will present the report and recommendation to Council on February 7, and Council will vote on whether to adopt, amend and adopt, or reject the ordinance on February 7.

Council President Hart then moved on to the next agenda item: the Council Retreat. It was scheduled for January 24 from 9am to 1pm. It will be public and livestreamed on the City’s YouTube channel.

[NOTE: Since this meeting, the retreat was canceled due to a councilmember’s family emergency. A new date for the retreat will be announced soon.]

Council President Hart reviewed that, at the retreat, Council will discuss Council rules and strategy for the next few years.

Councilmember Moore asked whether the retreat will be in Council Chambers or the Executive Conference Room, noting that the latter is better suited for discussion; Council President Hart confirmed with the city administrator availability for the Executive Conference Room.

Councilmember Cuda stated that he had spoken with Council President Hart about incorporating a discussion of collaboration on the agenda; she stated that it would need to be limited, no more than 30 minutes, and Councilmember Cuda agreed.

Council President Hart also requested the legal department include in Council’s next packet our own most recent Council rules, including temporary standing rules that were enacted last year (all of which expired on December 31, 2021), as well as council rules from other cities so we can see what others are doing as we are creating our own. Hart also asked whether other cities have conducted strategy sessions; the law director stated that there have been, though he does not have details on those.

Council President Hart then moved on to the next agenda item: Other.

Councilmember Cuda said that he and Councilmember Russell would like to schedule a Safety and Health Committee meeting on February 7 at 5:00 or 5:15, and he asked how he should go about doing that. Mayor Seren stated that Committee chairs need to email him and the clerk of council (Amy Himmelein) with the meeting agenda, requested meeting date and time, any technical needs (e.g., Zoom or Webex link, equipment for a PowerPoint presentation, etc.), and any other requests from staff. Councilmember Cuda stated that he would like to schedule a meeting for the Housing Committee as well, as soon as the committee can coordinate their availability.

Council President Hart stated that she would like the committees to have regular, monthly meetings on the City calendar so that much of the work of Council can be done in those meetings, negating the need for weekly Committee of the Whole meetings. Mayor Seren agreed that having standing committee meetings results in more effective council work and stated that he and his staff are in the process of digitizing the scheduling for Council Chambers and the Executive Conference Room, so this should be easier to do in the future.

Councilmember Cuda confirmed with Clerk of Council Himmelein that the calendar on the City website is up to date.

Council President Hart said that she would help Council committee chairs determine their monthly meeting dates so as to ensure there are no scheduling conflicts among the committees.

Councilmember Russell asked about scheduling Council committee meetings on Mondays prior to Council meetings to decrease the number of evenings that councilmembers and City staff need to be at City Hall. Council President Hart agreed that this would be a good idea.

Councilmember Russell then asked Council President Hart to have the Finance Committee develop a way for business owners to request some of the $1 million in ARPA funds that have been reserved for Cleveland Heights businesses; Hart agreed that the committee would do that. Mayor Seren said that the only legislation the Council has passed for allocation of ARPA funds has been for sewer repairs and for $5 million for the Noble area ($2 million), the Taylor area ($2million), and the other business districts ($1 million); for the latter, Council has not yet specified how those funds would be used. Council President Hart said she would put it on the Finance Committee’s agenda, and Councilmember Moore asked Councilmember Mattox (who chairs the Planning and Economic Development Committee) whether it should also be discussed among his committee; Councilmember Mattox stated that the Finance Committee and the Planning and Economic Development Committee should work together to determine how best to make these funds available to city business owners.

Council President Hart then adjourned the meeting.

City Council Meeting

You can find the agenda HERE, a synopsis of the legislation that was read HERE, and the council packet for the week HERE. You can watch a video of the meeting HERE.

Council President Hart called the meeting called to order.

The Clerk of Council called the roll: Present: Hart, Cobb, Russell, Moore, Cuda, and Mattox. The Clerk of Council confirmed that there is a quorum.

Hart then approved minutes of the December 20, 2021 and January 3, 2022 City Council meetings, noting that any amendments should have been referred to the City Administrator by this time.

Hart then opened personal communications from our citizens. The Clerk of Council announced residents who had signed in to speak.

  • One resident, a member of the People for the Park, stated that three members of the committee of petitioners responded to the City’s requests for proposals for Meadowbrook-Lee four times between 2013 and 2019 and their submissions were rejected; on June 24, 2021, a still-active lawsuit was filed regarding the lack of public notice of the special city council meeting of June 28, 2021, where the nonbinding memorandum of understanding with F&C, Inc. for the Cedar-Lee project was approved; the People for the Park have been transparent in their efforts, and the City did not include language in the Development Agreement with F&C in anticipation of the possibility of the park initiative passing. He requested the initiative be put on the May 3 ballot without delay and that the People for the Park be allowed to present at the upcoming public hearing regarding the initiative ordinance.
  • One resident asked a question about the ARPA funds and how they would be allocated. Mayor Seren stated that public comments are not a dialogue but rather a chance for residents to speak directly to Council and the City administration. The resident also reflected on the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.
  • One resident began by voicing approval of the way the Committee of the Whole meeting was facilitated. She then stated that she regrets signing the petition for the park initiative, clarifying that she signed it because she supports democracy and putting issues on the ballot. She said that she is now hearing the People for the Park claiming that everyone who signed the petition supports their proposal, while she and others that she knows signed it because they support ballot access for citizen-led initiatives. She said that when she was asked to sign, she told them that she would probably vote no. She feels it is disingenuous for the petitioners to claim that everyone who signed supported the park when many simply support access to the ballot. However, she stated, if she were asked again, she would not sign the petition.
  • One resident, a member of the People for the Park, stated that there was discussion on NextDoor of the legality of the initiative when there is a signed contract in place with F&C; she felt that the rhetoric used in the prior week’s Committee of the Whole was discouraging, muddied the waters unnecessarily, gave the impression that Council opposed the initiative, and generated conflict in the community. She reiterated that she believes the city can do the development and the activity park in the vacant lot, and she stated that the community has not been informed about the complicated financing within the development agreement. She feels that the development agreement should be worked on. She said that the park could be paid for through grants.
  • One resident and business owner in the Cedar-Lee commercial district spoke on behalf of herself and other business owners in the district to voice their strong support for the Cedar-Lee-Meadowbrook development as contracted with F&C, including the public park that it will create. She also voiced her strong opposition to the park initiative proposal. She stated that if the petitioners are given the opportunity to present at the public hearing, then business owners and residents who oppose the park initiative should also be able to present their positions. She then thanked the Council for their leadership on this project, for including residents’ input in the development of the project, for their vision in balancing economic opportunity with quality of life throughout the design process, which, she stated, has been very transparent, and for taking positive steps toward keeping our city competitive.
  • One resident spoke about Ohio Open Meetings laws, reiterating that deliberations and voting for Council president and vice president should not occur in private meetings. She contended that Council cannot deliberate or count votes for an appointment to Council in private meetings. She then challenged a complaint against her by 14 people from the Noble Neighbors group, stating that it is filled with slanders and inaccuracies, as well as the presence of residents who do not live in the Noble area in that group. She also questioned FutureHeights’ collaboration with Noble Neighbors in planning projects for the Noble area and the interactions among the City, CDBG funds, FutureHeights, and Noble Neighbors.
  • One resident, who lives in the apartment building at 25 Severance Circle Drive, reported that the freight elevator in his building has been broken for several weeks, and that the other elevator is very small, about 4’x4’. With many residents in the building disabled and in wheelchairs, this means that few people can take the elevator at one time and, thus, there is a long wait for the elevator. He said he has called both the fire chief and the elevator inspector listed on the elevator certificate, and neither have returned his calls. The residents of the building need the elevator inspector to come and the City to help to get the landlord to properly repair the elevator. Mayor Seren responded that he would get in touch with him and will make sure the problem is resolved. Councilmember Davida Russell thanked the resident for bringing the issue to the City’s attention, and she is aware that this has been an ongoing issue, and she feels it is unfortunate that the problem persists. Councilmember Tony Cuda then asked the mayor that he had asked a staff member about ADA compliance but has not heard a response.

Council President Hart then closed public comments.

Council President Hart called for Communications from the Mayor. Mayor Kahlil Seren reflected on the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr., reminding that King was someone who demonstrated solidarity with workers and that we should resist current-day recastings of his legacy that ignores that. King was not colorblind and did see systemic abuses, understanding that taking action against those abuses was necessary. He saw the intersection of racial and economic injustices and how invented racial separations have been used to keep oppressed people apart. Mayor Seren recalled that King brought his message to Cleveland Heights a few months before his iconic “I Have a Dream” speech, where he addressed the predominantly white crowd at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church and said:

“The first thing we notice in this dream is the amazing universalism. It does not say some men. It says all men. It does not say white men. It says all men, which includes black men. It does not say all protestants. It says all men, which includes Roman Catholics. It does not say all gentiles. It says all men, which includes Jews.”

Mayor Seren said that although our city has come far since then, which we should be proud of, we have further to go. The mayor then wished Councilmember Anthony Mattox a happy birthday; thanked City employees for their long, hard work to clean up our streets during the snowstorm on January 19; acknowledged our safety forces, who responded to many calls during the storm; and expressed gratitude to our City refuse and recycling workers, who waded into sometimes waist-high snow to collect our residents’ garbage and recycling. Mayor Seren then encouraged residents to visit covidtest.gov, where you can order Covid tests at no cost, and to get vaccinated and boosted if you are medically able, and please wear a mask.

For the Communications and Recreation Committee, Councilmember Davida Russell presented the following legislation:

  • Resolution 005-2022: First Reading. A Resolution proclaiming February 2022 to be American Heart Month; and declaring an emergency. Passed 6-0.
  • Resolution 006-2022: First Reading. A Resolution recognizing February 2022 as National African American History Month; and declaring an emergency. Passed 6-0.

For the Finance Committee, Council President Hart presented the following legislation:

  • Ordinance 007-2022: First Reading. An Ordinance to amend certain subparagraphs of Ordinance No. 139-2021 (F), relating to appropriations and other expenditures of the City of Cleveland Heights, Ohio for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2022; and declaring an emergency. Passed 6-0.
  • Resolution 008-2022: First Reading. A Resolution updating the signatories designated for the account with Nirvana Public Funding, LLC; and declaring an emergency. Passed 6-0.
  • Resolution 009-2022: First Reading. A Resolution updating the list of City employees authorized to be signatories on certain City accounts; and declaring an emergency. Passed 6-0.

For the Housing and Building Committee, Councilmember Tony Cuda discussed that he has met with several residents on housing issues as well as representatives with FutureHeights, and will be meeting with representatives from the Home Repair Resource Center (HRRC), the Greater Cleveland Congregations (GCC), and others. He stated that our community is rich in resources to work on our housing issues, and he is excited to get to work as the chair of the Housing and Building Committee. Cuda had no legislation to present.

For the Municipal Services Committee, Councilmember Moore encouraged residents to download the Access CH app onto their smartphones, stating that it is an easy way to report problems or request City services and that residents can also check in on the status of reports and requests through the app as well. Moore had no legislation to present.

For the Planning and Development Committee, Councilmember Anthony Mattox presented the following legislation:

  • Ordinance 010-2022: First Reading Only. An Ordinance authorizing the Mayor to execute an agreement for the purchase of certain real property located at 13230-13232 Cedar Rd.; and declaring an emergency.
  • Ordinance 011-2022: First Reading. An Ordinance amending Ordinance No. 13-2019 to reflect the position of the Mayor and the elimination of the City Manager position based upon the change in form of government; authorizing the Mayor to file appropriate amended Articles of Incorporation. Passed 6-0.

For the Public Safety and Health Committee, Councilmember Cuda had no legislation to present. He reported that the committee plans on meeting on February 7, so please look for the meeting to be up on the City website soon.

For the Administrative Services Committee, Councilmember Craig Cobb had no committee report and no legislation to present.

Council President Hart then opened the floor for Council Member Comments.

Councilmember Mattox, in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, read a quote from Dr. King: “Life’s most persistent and urgent question is: ‘What are you doing for others?’” He encouraged everyone to make service not just a moment but a habit, especially thinking of those who need help the most.

Councilmember Moore reiterated Councilmember’s call to service, and she stated that she concurs with Mayor Seren that our City’s plow crews worked relentlessly and did an amazing job. In addition, in our own neighborhoods, she saw neighbors helping neighbors during and after the storm. She said this is what she loves about Cleveland Heights: we come together when times are tough. She encouraged everyone to strive to sustain that sense of community every day, not just when extreme weather strikes.

Mayor Seren asked to speak, explaining that Ordinance 11-2022 was not passed as an emergency, and as a result, it would not take effect for two weeks, and the administration needs it to take effect. So he asked Council to entertain a motion to reconsider that item, move to suspend the rules to pass the item on first reading, and then move to pass the item again. Council agreed and did so.

The Council President’s then gave her report. She also thanked the City crews for their excellent work during the snowstorm. She announced that there will be a Council retreat on Monday, January 24, from 9am to 1pm. [This has been canceled due to a councilmember’s family emergency; it will be rescheduled soon.] She then entertained a motion to hold a public hearing on Monday, January 24, at 6:30pm regarding the Lee-Meadowbrook-Tullamore park petition initiative.

Council then went into executive session to discuss the appointment of a public official.

Upon exiting the executive session, Council President Hart adjourned the meeting.